Monday, April 16, 2018

Drinkable yogurt

Yogurt is among the most common dairy products consumed around the world, and its sensory attributes have a large effect on consumer acceptability. Yogurt is a cultured dairy product that can be made from whole, lowfat or skim milk, including reconstituted nonfat dry milk powder.

One of the forces behind the growth of the yogurt category over the past decade is drinkable yogurts. Whether at home or on-the-go, yogurt drinkables are one of the most convenient, nutritional, and kid endorsed options for parents today. Drinkable yogurt, categorized as stirred yogurt with a low viscosity, is a growing area of interest based on its convenience, portability, and ability to deliver all of the health and nutritional benefits of stirred or set yogurt.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA, 2008) standard of identity for drinkable yogurts specifies: It must contain a minimum of 8.25 percent milk solids not fat and 3.25 percent milkfat prior to the addition of other ingredients. It also must be fermented with Streptococcus thermophilius and Lactobocilllus balgaricus.

Drinkable yoghurt can be positioned as a healthy snack that can be consumed at any time of day; for breakfast or as a snack at school or work. Because of the limited amount of milk needed, drinkable yogurts create possibilities for more affordable snacks. There are many possibilities for packaging such as carton boxes or easy-squeeze bags.
Drinkable yogurt
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